Exploring DeepFake Capabilities & Mitigation Strategies with University College London

Overview  NCC Group is an industry partner for University College London’s (UCL) Centre for Doctoral Training in Data Intensive Science (CDT in DIS). The UCL CDT in DIS encompasses a wide range of areas in the field of 'big-data' including the collection, storage and analysis of large datasets, as well as the use of complex … Continue reading Exploring DeepFake Capabilities & Mitigation Strategies with University College London

Research Report – Zephyr and MCUboot Security Assessment

Over the years, NCC Group has audited countless embedded devices for our customers. Through these security assessments, we have observed that IoT devices are typically built using a hodgepodge of chipset vendor board support packages (BSP), bootloaders, SDKs, and an established Real Time Operating System (RTOS) such as Mbed or FreeRTOS. However, we have recently … Continue reading Research Report – Zephyr and MCUboot Security Assessment

Curve9767 and Fast Signature Verification

This post is about elliptic curves as they are used in cryptography, in particular for signatures. There are many ways to define specific elliptic curves that strive to offer a good balance between security and performance; here, I am talking about specific contributions of mine: a new curve definition, and some algorithmic improvements that target … Continue reading Curve9767 and Fast Signature Verification

Whitepaper – Hardware-Backed Heist: Extracting ECDSA Keys from Qualcomm’s TrustZone

Editor's note: This work was also presented at ACM CCS 2019. Written by Keegan Ryan Trusted Execution Environments (TEEs) such as ARM TrustZone are in widespread usein both mobile and embedded devices, and they are used to protect sensitive secretswhile often sharing the same computational hardware as untrusted code. Althoughthere has been limited research in … Continue reading Whitepaper – Hardware-Backed Heist: Extracting ECDSA Keys from Qualcomm’s TrustZone

Blind Return Oriented Programming

tl;dr In 2014 a paper [http://www.scs.stanford.edu/brop/bittau-brop.pdf] which introduces Blind Return Oriented Programming (BROP), a state-of-the-art exploitation technique, was released by researchers from Stanford University. The paper discusses a general approach in which BROP is used to exploit services which are both vulnerable to stack-based buffer overflows and automatically recover after a crash. What is best … Continue reading Blind Return Oriented Programming

Some Notes About the Xen XSA-122 Bug

tl;dr; This is a summary of a vulnerability in Xen I found earlier in 2015, and why it’s not very useful in practice. Basically you can leak small amounts of memory from the hypervisor stack, but due to the way the associated hypercall is compiled, it turns out you can’t reliably leak very useful information. … Continue reading Some Notes About the Xen XSA-122 Bug

Tor Browser Research Report Released

This research was originally performed by researchers from iSec Partners (now NCC Group), and has been migrated to research.nccgroup.com for posterity, and can be downloaded below. Tor Browser Research Report Released 13 Aug 2014 - Tom Ritter, Andy Grant As part of our work with the Open Technology Fund, we recently worked with the Tor Project to … Continue reading Tor Browser Research Report Released

Advice for security decision makers contemplating the value of Antivirus

Over the last 12 months there has been an increasing amount of analysis on the effectiveness of desktop AntiVirus and its ability to detect and stop the reality of targeted attacks (I refuse to use the APT banner). This critique has been covered in pieces such as: The death of antivirus software (Infosec Island, January 2012)Is … Continue reading Advice for security decision makers contemplating the value of Antivirus

Research Paper – Recovering deleted data from the Windows registry

by Timothy D. Morgan The Windows registry serves as a primary storage location for system configurations and as such provides a wealth of information to investigators. Numerous researchers have worked to interpret the information stored in the registry from a digital forensic standpoint, but no definitive resource is yet available which describes how Windows deletes … Continue reading Research Paper – Recovering deleted data from the Windows registry